June 10th 2016 Bulletin: EU Referendum Developments

Posted by on Jun 10, 2016 in EU Referendum | No Comments

This week’s main developments:

 

1. Boris Johnson: British taxpayers will be hit with a £2.4billion bill if the UK stays in the EU
2. Sir John Major accuses Brexit campaign of ‘verging on the squalid’
3. MPs may push to keep UK in European single market despite Brexit vote
4. Nigel Farage: migrant sex attacks to be ‘nuclear bomb’ of EU referendum
5. ITV’s EU referendum debate with Cameron and Farage draws 4 million
6. Nicola Sturgeon accuses Boris Johnson of telling £350m ‘whopper’
7. Dr Sarah Wollaston defects from Vote Leave to remain campaign
8. In other news…

 

1. Boris Johnson: British taxpayers will be hit with a £2.4billion bill if the UK stays in the EU:
In a speech on Monday, Boris Johnson warned that British taxpayers will be hit with a £2.4billion bill if the UK stays in the European Union. Mr Johnson also claimed there is a “£20billion black hole” in the EU’s finances which will be paid in part by the UK unless Britain votes for a Brexit on June 23. In a sign that Mr Johnson’s Leave campaign intends to increasingly focus on the economy ahead of the referendum, the former mayor of London warns that the EU is “demanding even more of our money”. He went on to say British taxpayers face a “triple whammy of woe” as the EU hands the UK an extra £2.4billion bill, increases its overall budget because of the migration crisis and pays for potential bailouts of struggling eurozone economies. The Remain campaign described Mr Johnson’s claims as “ridiculous”.

 

Read more about this story here in The Telegraph, here in The Sun, here on The BBC, here in The Guardian, and here in The Daily Mail

 

2. Sir John Major accuses Brexit campaign of ‘verging on the squalid':
Former Prime Minister, Sir John Major, has accused the Brexit campaign of “verging on the squalid” and said he was “angry” they are “misleading” the public, because Boris Johnson and Michael Gove’s pro-Leave arguments are “deceitful.” In an extraordinary intervention taking aim at the former London mayor, Sir John said the “court jester” would not have the loyalty of Conservative MPs if he becomes party leader because he is not a serious politician, and he argued that the NHS would be as safe as a pet hamster in the presence of a hungry python if Boris Johnson, Michael Gove and Iain Duncan Smith rose to power following Brexit. The former prime minister insisted his intervention was not a personal slight against Johnson or Gove, but a more general criticism of the leave campaign’s shift to the right on immigration and claims that they would protect the NHS. Speaking on BBC1’s The Andrew Marr Show, Sir Major went on to claim Gove had wanted to privatise the NHS, Johnson wished to charge people for health services and Duncan Smith advocated moving to a social insurance system.

 

Read more about this story here in The Telegraph, here on The BBC, here in The Guardian, here in The Sun, here in The Independent, and here in The Daily Mail

 

3. MPs may push to keep UK in European single market despite Brexit vote:
According to the BBC, MPs who back the UK staying in the European Union may attempt to keep the country inside the single market even if there is a vote for Brexit. The pro-Remainers, who include most Labour MPs, a large number of Conservatives, and the SNP, hold a strong House of Commons majority are already planning to use their votes to push for the UK to remain inside the European single market, while accepting the public’s decision to exit the EU, in the event of a Leave victory in the 23rd June referendum. However, such a compromise would be highly controversial. Other countries which have access to the single market but are not EU members, like Norway, have to pay into the EU and accept the free movement of people – two of the key concerns raised by Leave campaigners in the referendum debate.
Read more about this story here in The Independent, here in The Sun, here in The Telegraph, and here in The BBC
4. Nigel Farage: migrant sex attacks to be ‘nuclear bomb’ of EU referendum:
Referendum campaigners on both sides have criticised the suggestion by UKIP leader Nigel Farage that the possibility of sex attacks on women will be the “nuclear bomb” of the EU referendum campaign. Speaking to the Sunday Telegraph, Farage said he wanted to raise concerns over safety for women as an issue with Britain’s membership of the EU. “The nuclear bomb this time would be about Cologne,” he said, referring to the reports in January that hundreds of women were sexually assaulted and robbed at the German city’s central station on New Year’s Eve. “There are some very big cultural issues,” Farage said. Asked whether mass sex attacks like those in Cologne could occur in the UK, he said: “It depends if they get EU passports. It depends if we vote for Brexit or not. It is an issue.” Sal Brinton, the president of the Liberal Democrats, said Farage had “sunk to new depths in his scaremongering” with his remarks, which were completely unacceptable.
Read more about this story here in The Guardian, here on The BBC, here in The Telegraph, here in The Sun, and here in The Independent
5. ITV’s EU referendum debate with Cameron and Farage draws 4 million:
ITV’s referendum debate between David Cameron and Nigel Farage drew an average of 4 million viewers, making it the most popular current affairs show so far this year. Mr Farage and Mr Cameron did not debate head-to-head but appeared in turn on the ITV referendum special – hosted by Julie Etchingham – each facing half-an-hour of questions on the economy, immigration, security and sovereignty from the 200-strong audience. UKIP leader, Nigel Farage, faced accusations of “inflammatory” scaremongering during exchanges with members of the public, but he insisted there was wide support for “getting a grip” on migration, including from ethnic minority groups. The PM said there were “good and bad ways” to control immigration but warned against a “Little England” stance. Nigel Farage defended himself against claims of racism, saying that comments he made about the possibility of Cologne-style sex attacks in Britain were “a tiddly issue” in the EU referendum campaign.
Read more about this story here in The Guardian, here in The Telegraph, here in The BBC, and here in The Independent

 

6. Nicola Sturgeon accuses Boris Johnson of telling £350m ‘whopper':
The Scottish first minister Nicola Sturgeon has led a concerted onslaught from senior remain campaigners aimed at discrediting Boris Johnson, in a heated ITV television debate that saw him attacked for telling “whoppers”. Mr Johnson was accused of misleading the public and putting his own career before the good of the country – including by his Conservative colleague energy secretary Amber Rudd. Nicola Sturgeon described it as a “scandal” that Mr Johnson’s Vote Leave campaign bus still has the controversial claim that Britain sends £350m a week to Brussels emblazoned on the side of it. The figure has been called “potentially misleading” by the independent Statistics Authority, for failing to take into account the UK’s rebate from the EU. Ms Sturgeon accused Mr Johnson – who repeatedly defended the number during the debate – as “driving around the country in a bus with a giant whopper painted on the side”. Labour’s Angela Eagle, also making the case for remain, joined Ms Sturgeon and Ms Rudd on the attack, in another of the extraordinary combinations that have characterised the referendum campaign. At one point Eagle jabbed her finger at Johnson, saying, “get that lie off your bus!”. Amber Rudd suggested Boris Johnson was keener on furthering his own career than standing by his principles.
Read more about this story here in The Telegraph, here in The Guardian, here in The Daily Mail, and here in on The BBC

 

7. Dr Sarah Wollaston defects from Vote Leave to remain campaign:
The influential Conservative MP Dr Sarah Wollaston has revealed that she is defecting from the campaign for a leave vote in this month’s referendum and will be casting a vote for Britain to remain in the European Union. Just over four months after announcing that her clear preference was for the UK’s withdrawal from the union, the MP said on Wednesday night that she no longer felt comfortable being part of the Vote Leave campaign and said its claim that a Brexit would unlock up to £350m a week for the NHS “simply isn’t true”. In an interview with the BBC, Wollaston said that she had undergone a change of heart after her postal vote arrived and she started to think how she would feel on the morning of 24 June if the result of the referendum turned out to be a victory for the leave campaign. “I realised I would feel a sense of loss, that we had lost something, and I am now actually going to vote to remain,” she said.
Read more about this story here in The Mirror, here in The Guardian, here in The Telegraph, and here in on The BBC

 

 

8. In other news:

 

• Labour claims Brexit could bring £18bn cuts. Read here more.

• Pound slides to fresh lows after polls show growing Brexit support. Read more here.
• Brexit ‘could boost NHS by £100m a week.’ Read more here.
• Doctors warn Brexit could harm patient care and public health. Read more here.
• Heidi Alexander: Brexit would blow £10.5bn hole in NHS budget. Read more here.
• Osborne: Brexit would bring ‘economic shock’ to Northern Ireland. Read more here.
• William Hague: leaving EU risks fragmenting western world. Read more here.

June 3rd 2016 Bulletin: EU Referendum Developments

Posted by on Jun 3, 2016 in EU Referendum | No Comments

This week’s main developments:

 

1. David Cameron comes under fire in the first televised debate of the referendum campaign.
2. Vote Leave argues that Brexit would mean an end for VAT on fuel, but claims are called ‘fantasy economics.’
3. Migration Watch report branded ‘false and bogus’ as it claims up to half a million refugee families could move to Britain using EU free movement rules after 2020
4. David Cameron is ‘proud to campaign’ alongside Sadiq Khan to stay in EU
5. Leave campaigners pledge ‘fairer immigration’ outside EU
6. Brexit could spread shockwaves through global economy, says OECD
7. UK cannot and must not close borders to EU workers, says Jeremy Corbyn
8. In other news…

 

1. David Cameron comes under fire in the first televised debate of the referendum campaign:

 
During a live 30-minute question session on Sky News, David Cameron issued a direct appeal to the British public not to commit an act of “economic self-harm” by voting to leave the European Union in an attempt to cut immigration. He insisted that leaving the EU would be a “roll of the dice” on the future of “our children and grandchildren”, and insisted: “Britain does not succeed when we quit.” Cameron repeatedly returned to the economic risks of choosing Brexit on 23 June in what was the first televised debate of the referendum campaign. Mr Cameron came under sustained hostile questioning from the audience, who had been chosen to represent evenly the pro-EU, anti-EU and undecided camps. The stand out audience member was Soraya Bouazzaoui, who questioned him about Turkey joining the EU and having links with Isis. When the prime minister answered, she interrupted him to say that, as an English literature student, “she could spot waffling when she saw it”. Furthermore, the audience burst out laughing when Islam asked which would come first after the UK left the EU – global recession or world war three.

 
Read more about this story here on Sky News, here on The Guardian, here on The BBC, here in The Mirror, and here in The Telegraph

 

2. Vote Leave argues that Brexit would mean an end VAT on fuel, but claims are called ‘fantasy economics:’

 
Leading Brexit campaigners have called for VAT on fuel bills to be scrapped, triggering an angry response from those fighting to stay in the EU that their opponents are promoting “fantasy economics”. Boris Johnson, Michael Gove and Gisela Stuart have clashed with the chancellor over their claim that the EU is preventing the UK from cutting a tax that hits the poorest households hardest. Osborne said Brexit would push up taxes, including VAT. Writing in the Sun newspaper about VAT Mr Johnson, Mr Gove and Ms Stuart said: “The poorest households spend three times more of their income on household energy bills than the richest households spend. As long as we are in the EU, we are not allowed to cut this tax. When we vote leave, we will be able to scrap this unfair and damaging tax.” But Mr Osborne hit back, claiming it was “more fantasy economics from Vote Leave”. He argued that leaving the EU would result in a smaller economy, a hole in public finances and higher taxes, including VAT.

 
Read more about this story here in The BBC, here in The Sun, here in The Guardian, and here in The Daily Mail

 

3. Migration Watch report branded ‘false and bogus’ as it claims up to half a million refugee families could move to Britain using EU free movement rules after 2020:

 
An ‘illustartive’ report published by think tank Migration Watch has predicted that as many as 10 per cent of the Syrians, Afghans and Iraqis who are granted asylum in Europe will move to the UK once they get EU citizenship. The group, which campaigns for tighter border controls, said this meant the total “refugee inflow” to Britain in the coming years could hit as high as 480,000 – equal to the population of Edinburgh. Lord Green, Migration Watch chair, said: “The UK could well face a significant secondary flow of refugees from Europe in the coming years…While the UK has so far been largely shielded from the crisis in southern Europe, this potential flow can only add to the impact of migration which is already seriously affecting communities across the country.” The report directly challenges Government claims that Britain is insulated from the migration crisis in mainland Europe because it is not part of the ‘open borders’ Schengen zone. However, Britain Stronger in Europe said the study was based on the “false and bogus” assumption that refugees would be granted EU citizenship.

 
Read more about this story here in The Sun, here in The Guardian, here in The Daily Mail, and here in The Telegraph.

 

4. David Cameron is ‘proud to campaign’ alongside Sadiq Khan to stay in EU:

 
David Cameron has hailed Labour’s Sadiq Khan as “a proud Muslim” and “a proud Brit” as he shared a platform with the London Mayor at an EU Remain rally. They were launching a Britain Stronger In Europe battle bus and pledge card. But Vote Leave said the PM’s criticisms of Mr Khan during the mayoral contest less than a month ago showed he could not be trusted. Mr Cameron repeatedly attacked Mr Khan for having a history of sharing platforms with extremists – a claim firmly rejected by Mr Khan – as part of the Conservatives’ failed campaign to get Zac Goldsmith elected to City Hall. At the Remain campaign event in London, Mr Cameron appeared to bury the hatchet. He shook hands with Mr Khan and congratulated him on his victory in the mayoral contest, telling the crowd: “I’m proud to be here with the mayor of London – with the Labour mayor of London – on this vital, vital issue.” The prime minister said he expected many disagreements with the London Mayor but they were both part of “an incredibly broad campaign” in favour of EU membership.

 
Read more about this story here in The BBC, here in The Independent, here in The Daily Mail, here in The Sun, and here in The Guardian

 

 

5. Leave campaigners pledge ‘fairer immigration’ outside EU:

 
Boris Johnson, Michael Gove and Priti Patel, all of whom sit in the main or political cabinet, said in a joint statement on Tuesday they favoured a “genuine Australian-style points-based immigration system … the automatic right of all EU citizens to come to live and work in the UK will end.” They went on to say this immigration system would be “fairer, more humane” as the EU free movement rules have hit wages and strained public services. Britain currently has a points-based immigration system for people coming to work in the UK from outside the EU, which means entry to work is limited to people deemed to be of value to the UK economy, such as skilled workers in “shortage occupations” or wealthy entrepreneurs and investors. Leave campaigners want the points system to be extended to cover EU migrants, who are currently free to come to the UK and take up jobs, including low-paid manual work – but it would be up to the government of the day to decide whether to adopt this policy.
However, adopting an Australian-style immigration system could “crash our economy”, David Cameron has warned, with George Osborne, the chancellor, branding the promise of a points-based system “fantasy politics” that would lead to a rise in net migration. Remain campaigners have said the plan would be economically disastrous and could even lead to higher levels of net migration. “Australia has more migration per head than we do here in the UK, so I think it’s the wrong approach,” the prime minister told BBC Radio 5 Live.

 
Read more about this story here in The Telegraph, here in The BBC, here in The Guardian, and here in The Sun

 

6. Brexit could spread shockwaves through global economy, says OECD:

 
Britain’s departure from the European Union poses as big a threat to the global economy as a “hard landing” in China, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development has said. The Paris-based think tank said Brexit would have significant costs not just for the UK and Europe, but for the rest of the world. Catherine Mann, the chief economist at the OECD, said the uncertainty caused by the referendum came at a time when the global economy was caught in a low-growth trap. “Spillovers could be significant to other countries,” Mann said, as she predicted that the world economy would grow by 3% in 2016 and by 3.3% in 2017 – forecasts that have remained unchanged since its last health check three months ago. Analysis by the OECD found that the UK economy would be just under 1.5 percentage points smaller in 2018 after Brexit than it would be if the country voted to stay in the EU on 23 June. The Irish economy – due to its close trade and financial links – would be about 1.25 points smaller, the eurozone economy 1 percentage point smaller and growth for the OECD – a group of 34 rich countries – would be reduced by just over half a point.

 
Read more about this story here in The Daily Mail, here in The Guardian, and here in The BBC

 
7. UK cannot and must not close borders to EU workers, says Jeremy Corbyn:

 
Giving a speech to a crowd of Labour members in Westminster, Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the Labour Party, said Britain “cannot and must not close the borders” to workers from the European Union, as he delivered his strongest argument yet for Britain to vote remain in the referendum. The party leader acknowledged that some voters had understandable concerns about the impact of immigration, but he blamed the government for cutting public services and failing to protect workers from exploitation. He also laid out a series of areas where the EU had brought improvements for Britain, from setting standards for cleaner beaches to protecting workers’ rights. He argued that the leaders of Vote Leave would sacrifice those rights if Britain left the EU, saying: “A Tory Brexit negotiation would be a disaster for many working people in Britain.” The Labour leader, who has been a Eurosceptic for much of his parliamentary career, also stressed that he would like to see the EU reformed to become more of a “social Europe”. “We believe that Europe can and must do far more to meet the needs of our people. That’s why we make the case for remain. We also make the Labour case for reform,” he said, calling for a Europe of “cooperation and solidarity” he said.

 
Read more about this story here in The Guardian, here in The Independent, here in The BBC, here in the International Business Times and here in The Telegraph

 

8. In other news:

• Pub chain JD Wetherspoon issues Brexit beer mats. Read more here.
• Brexit ‘would leave British workers £38 a week worse off’ wars TUC chief. Read more here.
• Pound slides sharply against US Dollar after poll gives Brexit lead. Read more here.
• 200 Cambridge University academics express ‘grave concern’ over impact of Brexit. Read more here.
• Angela Merkel says she hopes Britain will remain in the EU. Read more here.
• Boris Johnson attacks EU ‘burden’ on UK farming. Read more here.

May 27th 2016 Bulletin: EU Referendum Developments

Posted by on May 27, 2016 in EU Referendum | No Comments

This week’s main developments:

 

1. Brexit would cause ‘DIY recession’ says Osborne, but Iain Duncan Smith calls him ‘Pinocchio’
2. NHS chief says Brexit would be dangerous for health service
3. Iain Duncan Smith claims that Business Secretary Sajid Javid privately backs Brexit
4. Vote Leave embroiled in race row over Turkey security threat claims
5. IFS warns Brexit would extend austerity for two more years
6. G7 world leaders say Brexit poses a serious risk to global growth
7. Alex Salmond says Scotland would leave UK in event of Brexit
8. In other news

 

1. Brexit would cause ‘DIY recession’ says Osborne, but Iain Duncan Smith calls him ‘Pinocchio’:

 
Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, and Prime Minister, David Cameron, presented Treasury analysis into the short-term economic impact of Brexit which shows there would more than likely be a yearlong “DIY recession”. The report also claims GDP will be 3.6% lower after two years than it would be if Britain votes to remain and warns of a sharp rise in inflation, with house price growth hit by 10%, as it compares the expected uncertainty to that experienced in the early 1990s recession. The report has already been branded dishonest and “deeply biased” by the Tory MP and former Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith, who said, after hearing of Osborne’s warning, “I did think of Pinocchio and the nose growing rather long.”

 
Read more about this story here in The Independent, here in The Daily Mail, here in The Guardian, here in The Telegraph, here in The BBC, and here in The Sun

 

2. NHS chief says Brexit would be dangerous for health service:

 
The chief executive of NHS England, Simon Stevens, has warned that Britain leaving the EU could send the economy into a “tailspin” that would have a damaging knock-on effect for the health service. In the interview with BBC 1’s The Andrew Marr Show, Stevens countered claims by leave campaigners that Brexit would free up funds for the NHS and reduce pressure on GP surgeries and hospitals by limiting further immigration. Instead, he claimed that it would be a dangerous risk for NHS funds that were desperately needed to pay for cancer treatments and mental health investment. Stevens said, whilst it was not his job to tell the British people how to vote, he believed there was no potential benefit to the NHS from Brexit, and pointed out that the NHS had benefited “enormously” from 130,000 European Union doctors, nurses and care-workers.

 
Read more about this story here in The Sun, here on The Guardian, here in The BBC, and here in The Telegraph

 
3. Iain Duncan Smith claims that Business Secretary Sajid Javid privately backs Brexit:

 
Iain Duncan Smith, has said that Business Secretary, Sajid Javid had admitted that he wants the UK to leave the European Union, before publically backing the Remain campaign on BBC Radio 4 Today programme. In the Radio 4 programme, Mr Javid defended the latest Treasury analysis warning of a year-long recession if the UK electorate vote to leave the EU. However, the pro-Brexit Mr Duncan Smith told the programme he was “deeply disappointed” in Mr Javid as “having privately said how much he wanted the UK to leave the European Union, he is now defending this terrible report”. Pressed on whether Mr Javid had said to him he wanted out, Mr Duncan Smith replied: “He has.” Asked whether that meant Mr Javid was “lying in public”, Mr Duncan Smith said: “He has written it in an article.” However, a Whitehall source close to Mr Javid denied Mr Duncan Smith’s claim, saying: “It is simply not true. Sajid Javid has said no such thing either in private or public”.

 
Read more about this story here in The Sun, here in The Independent, and here in The Guardian

 

4. Vote Leave embroiled in race row over Turkey security threat claims:

 
On the eve of an England v Turkey football match in Manchester, the official campaign to leave the EU fronted by Michael Gove has been accused of “stoking the fires of prejudice” after it claimed that continued membership would put Britons in danger as a result of a high level of criminality and gun ownership among Turkish citizens. The Vote Leave campaign argued that not only was Turkey about to join the EU, but that its citizens pose a threat to national security and public services. Penny Mordaunt, Armed Forces minister went on to tell the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show that Turkey is set to join the EU in the next eight years and the UK will be unable to block the move. However, the Prime Minister said such a move would happen “in about the year 3000” and said Ms Mordaunt was “absolutely wrong” to say the UK does not have a veto on whether Turkey is allowed to accede to the bloc. David Cameron accused her of “flat out lying.”

 

Read more about this story here in The Guardian, here in The Sun, here in The Independent, and here in The Daily Mail

 

5. IFS warns Brexit would extend austerity for two more years:

 
Britain’s leading tax and spending think tank, the Institute for Fiscal Studies, has warned that leaving the European Union would force ministers to extend austerity measures by up to two years to achieve a budget surplus. The independent IFS said the impact of lower GDP growth and extra borrowing costs would knock a £20bn to £40bn hole in the government’s finances by 2020 and leave ministers struggling to balance the books before 2022, two years later than forecast. Furthermore, in reference to the Vote Leave campaign, the think tank disputed the claim that the UK sends £350m to Brussels every week, saying the figure was more like £150m once the rebate was deducted from the total and funds for research and business subsidies are taken into account. The IFS said that even on an optimistic forecast for the UK’s economic performance after leaving the EU, the £150m financial benefit would not compensate for a loss of income from falling foreign investment and overseas trade that would leave taxpayers to pick up a huge bill.

 
Read more about this story here on The BBC, here in The Independent, here in The Sun, here on The Guardian, and here in The Telegraph

 

6. G7 world leaders say Brexit poses a serious risk to global growth:

 
In a G7 meeting in Japan, seven world leaders have warned of the risk to global economy if Britain votes to leave the European Union in a referendum next month. The UK leaving the European Union would “reverse the trend towards greater global trade and investment, and the jobs they create, and is a further serious risk to growth” they said in a joint declaration. The warning was listed together with concerns about terrorism, the refugee crisis and geopolitical conflicts as a potential threat of a “non-economic origin”. Speaking to the press at the conclusion of the G7 talks on Friday, David Cameron said the UK should “listen to our friends” on the issue of EU membership.

 
Read more about this story here in The Daily Mail, here in The BBC, here in The Guardian, and here in The Independent

 
7. Alex Salmond says Scotland would leave UK in event of Brexit:

 
Alex Salmond, the former First Minister and now the Scottish National party’s foreign affairs spokesman in Westminster, argued in the first televised debate of the referendum campaign, that the Scottish government would hold a fresh independence referendum – and win it – within two years, if Scotland was at risk of being “dragged” out of the European Union after June’s referendum. He said that, in the event England votes to leave the EU but Scotland votes remain, a second Scottish referendum would have to be called within two years, due to an exit clause under article 50 of the Libson treaty and he would expect it to be won.

 
Read more about this story here in The Guardian, here in The Independent, and here on The BBC

 

8. In other news:

 

• I’m no secret Brexiteer, says David Cameron. Read more here.
• National press biased in favour of Brexit, says study. Read more here.
• Angela Eagle tries to make the case for women to vote Remain, after saying the EU debate is a ‘Tory blokes… playground spat.’ Read more here.
• Ex-military officers fighting for EU exit. Read more here.
• Vote to leave EU would ‘condemn Britain to irrelevance’, say 300 historians. Read more here.
• Pensioners could lose £32,000 after Brexit, George Obsorne claims. Read more here.

May 13th 2016 Bulletin: EU Referendum Developments

Posted by on May 13, 2016 in EU Referendum | No Comments

This week’s main developments:

 

1. David Cameron warns that leaving the EU would threaten UK’s peace and stability
2. Boris Johnson says David Cameron’s EU talks are a ‘failure’
3. George Osborne warns Brexit would hit house prices significantly
4. Michael Gove argues that Brexit would make UK safer
5. Gordon Brown says quitting EU would not be British
6. Iain Duncan Smith says the EU helps the rich at the expense of the poor
7. Alan Johnson argues that Brexiters without good word for EU are not rational
8. In other news

 

1. David Cameron warns that leaving the EU would threaten UK’s peace and stability:

 

In a speech at the British Museum in London this week David Cameron, Prime Minister, warned that peace and stability cannot be assured in Europe if the UK decides to leave the EU. In the speech, Mr Cameron moved the Remain campaign focus from highlighting the economic risks of leave the EU, to highlighting what he called the “patriotic choice”. Drawing on a variety of historic events, from the Roman Empire to the fall of the Berlin Wall, Mr Cameron argued that Britain’s destiny is “inextricably bound up with Europe’s”. “Can we be so sure that peace and stability on our continent are assured beyond any shadow of doubt? Is that a risk worth taking? I would never be so rash as to make that assumption.” He said that the EU, with Britain’s assistance, had helped bring together countries that had been “at each other’s throats for decades” and said leaving risked “the clock being turned back to an age of competing nationalism in Europe”.
Leave campaigners accusing Downing Street of “losing the plot”.

 

Read more about this story here in The BBC, here in The Sun, here in The Guardian, here in The Telegraph, here in The Daily Mail, here in The Independent and here in The Mirror

 

2. Boris Johnson says David Cameron’s EU talks are a ‘failure’:

 

Just hours after David Cameron made his speech, former London Mayor, Boris Johnson made a speech in London in which he called the EU “virtually identical” after David Cameron’s EU reform talks. Eurosceptics had been “excited” by the “fundamental, far-reaching change” Mr Cameron had promised for the discussions with the EU, Mr Johnson said, but “quietly despaired as no reform were forthcoming”. “If you look at what we were promised, and what we got, the government should logically be campaigning on our side today,” he said. These comments came after Mr Johnson began his country wide tour on the Vote Leave “battle bus,” which is has emerged was built in Poland, but a German company, and would have be 13% more experience if Britain was outside the EU due to tariffs, therefore having the bus renamed the “blunder bus” by critics.

 

Read more about this story here on The BBC, here in The Guardian, here in The Sun and here in The Daily Mail

 

3. George Osborne warns Brexit would hit house prices significantly:

 

Speaking on the first episode of ITV’s Peston on Sunday, George Osborne, Chancellor of the Exchequer, stated that leaving the EU would hit house prices significantly and make mortgages more expensive. Despite the remain campaigning moving from economic arguments to patriotic arguments this week, Mr Osborne alliterated his plans of publishing Treasury research which will highlight the short-term costs of Brexit, which includes the finding that property prices could fall. Osborne argued that Brexit would be a “catastrophe” in terms of lost jobs and could “wreck the economy”.
Mr Osborne also took on the argument of his colleague, the Justice Secretary and Leave campaigner, Michael Gove, by saying “We’ve just had the leave campaign admit this morning that Britain would leave the single market – that is the largest free trade area in the world. That would be catastrophic for people’s jobs and their incomes and their livelihoods. Now, some people might think wrecking the economy is a price worth paying. I absolutely reject that.”

 

Read more about this story here in The Telegraph, here in The Guardian, here in The Mirror, here on The BBC, here on The Sun and here in The Daily Mail

 

4. Michael Gove argues that Brexit would make UK safer:

 

In an interview with The Daily Telegraph, Michael Gove has argued that “life in this country would change because Britain would be safer” if voters back Brexit in the June referendum. He went on to argue that in the event of a Brexit, Britain’s borders and national security laws must be immediately changed, in order to free intelligence agencies from European law, allow foreign criminals and terrorists to be deported without hindrance, and free the British armed forces from Brussels rules. He argued that, whilst he would want David Cameron to remain Prime Minister, he would also want Mr Cameron to “instantly” enact new laws to stop the influence of “rogue” European courts and allow the immediate deportation of terrorists. Whilst others have argued that the process of Britain replacing EU laws could take years, Mr Gove said that the process should actually begin immediately with a series of interim emergency laws.

 

Read more about this story here in The Telegraph, here in The BBC, here in The Independent and here in The Daily Mail

 
5. Gordon Brown says quitting EU would not be British:

 

In a speech at the London School of Economics, the former Prime Minister, Gordon Brown argued that it is “not British to retreat to Europe’s sidelines.” He said that Britain needs to be in the EU to shape the continence’s response to terrorism, immigration and climate change, whereas it is not “in tune with the Churchillian spirit” to “disengage”. In the speech, Mr Brown invoked Britain’s history of standing up for human rights and fighting fascism and anti-Semitism. He said the EU referendum should be an opportunity to make the positive case for Europe and the UK’s “outward looking internationalism.” He argued that “We should recognise that the world has changed since the first referendum and we should be advocates for cooperation in an inter-dependent world.”

 

Read more about this story here on The BBC, here in The Guardian, here in The Independent and here in The Daily Mail

 

6. Iain Duncan Smith says the EU helps the rich at the expense of the poor:

 

In a speech on Tuesday, the former Work and Pensions Secretary, Iain Duncan Smith argued that the EU helps the “haves” at the expense of the “have-nots.” He argued that the EU’s immigration policy drives down wages and increases the cost of living. Furthermore, he claimed that immigration is driving a rise in house prices and as a result young people in particular have lost out on housing. Mr Duncan Smith argued that uncontrolled migration is hitting the poorest in British society by putting pressure onto schools and hospitals, and claimed that David Cameron has failed to achieve any significant reform with his EU renegotiation. Mr Duncan Smith also argued that that the EU had benefited the wealthy because it had created “cheap nannies, baristas and labourers”.

 

However, a landmark study from the London School of Economics has been published that concluded that immigration had not driven down wages or increased unemployment. Read the report from the LSE on Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK here.

 

Read more about this story here in The Independent, here in The Guardian, here in The Telegraph, here in The Daily Mail, here in The Sun and here in The BBC

 

7. Alan Johnson argues that Brexiters without good word for EU are not rational:

 

During the launch of a bus tour of the UK, in Southbank, London, the leader of Labour’s in campaign, Alan Johnson, branded the most staunchly pro-Brexit campaigners “extremists.” Mr Johnson said those campaigning for Brexit without anything good to say about the EU were the extremists in the debate, demonstrating a mentality that is “not rational and not balanced”. He went on to argue that the referendum on the UK’s membership of the EU was the most important political decision in his lifetime and the Labour party would “remorselessly” throw itself into the campaign. “Every sinew, every muscle will be stretched, every piece of energy, every resource in the Labour party will be put into this campaign to get a remain vote,” Johnson said.

 

Read more about this story here in The Sun, here in The Guardian, here in The Daily Mail and here on The BBC

 

8. In other news:

 

• Brexit ‘will put UK access to cutting-edge medicines at risk.’ Read more here.
• ITV accused of backing Remain amid EU referendum debates row. Read more here.
• Chatham House backs EU referendum ‘Remain’ campaign. Read more here.
• EU membership has added £1,800 to British pay packets, business lobby group London First claims. Read more here.
• Business support for EU membership has fallen in run-up to referendum. Read more here.
• Nato and US defence chiefs with stark warning that Brexit would damage Western security and leave UK ‘dangerously weakened.’ Read more here.
• Leave.EU condemned for sharing ‘xenophobic’ and ‘disgusting’ video narrated by Donald Trump. Read more here.
• UK think tank says exit from EU would be ‘significant shock.’ Read more here.
• EU membership good for UK as it gives medical students access to more diseases, says Labour peer. Read more here.